Foreclosures and Short Sales 101

Short Sales and Foreclosures

With many sellers facing foreclosure, these ‘distressed’ homes have become a large portion of real estate sales.   As you begin your home search, you will hear the terms ‘Short Sale’ and REO or foreclosure or ‘bank owned’.  There is  a difference:  A home that has been taken back by the bank will be called an REO or a foreclosure.  If the home has not yet been taken back by the bank, but the borrower is in default and the home is worth less than is owed, it is called a ‘Short Sale’.  There are many types or flavors of each of these, each having its own pro’s and con’s.  Feel free to call anytime or e mail if you have any questions.  Below is a section of the  Oregon Property Buyer’s Guide discussing foreclosures and short sales. 

Short Sale Properties
A short sale is any sale where the purchase price will not result in sufficient proceeds to pay off the mortgage, or other liens, and clear the title. Short sales are typically made using a short sale addendum that makes the transaction contingent upon the seller obtaining the consent from their creditors permitting a reduction in the closing costs sufficient to close the transaction for the purchase price. Because the transaction is contingent upon the consent of third parties, short sales often fail. Buyers should understand and plan for the resulting uncertainty. Contract deadlines and termination provisions must be carefully considered in a short sale. Because the transaction is contingent on the consent of one of more third parties, sellers can, and often do, continue to market the property and seek better offers. Creditors will often demand changes in the terms of the sale agreement as a condition of giving their consent. Buyers should be prepared to deal with the additional uncertainty created by the potential for multiple offers and third party demands. Real estate licensees can give buyers important marketing, business and negotiating advice and information and can assist in preparation of the sale agreement but only pursuant to the client’s instructions. Real estate licensees are not attorneys and are prohibited by law from giving legal advice.

Real Estate Owned Properties
When a lender forecloses on a property, obtains title in lieu of foreclosure or otherwise obtains title to real property as a result of a mortgage or lien, the property becomes what is called “Real Estate Owned” or REO property. Lenders typically sell REO property using the same listing and marketing techniques as ordinary home owners. REO property, however, is almost always sold using forms and procedures developed by the lender. Such forms and procedures can significantly affect a buyer’s rights and obligations in the transaction. For instance, may REO forms delay formation of the contract until right before closing, or otherwise reserve to the seller the right to cancel the contract. Buyers should understand and plan for the resulting uncertainty. REO forms typically contain very detailed clauses that shift responsibility for the condition of the property to the buyer and make it difficult or impossible for the buyer to sue the seller if a defect is discovered after closing. Real estate licensees can give buyers important marketing, business and negotiating advice and information and can assist in preparation of the sale agreement but only pursuant to the client’s instructions. Real estate licensees are not attorneys and are prohibited by law from giving legal advice.

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About PortlandHouseListings.com - Tom Ramsey, local Realtor

Local Portland Realtor with 10 years experience specializing in residential sales and investment property. Tom Ramsey Oregon Real Estate Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate Phone: 503-481-0501 tomramsey1@gmail.com www.PortlandHouseListings.com
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